After the blast : the ecological recovery of Mount St. Helens
(Book)

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Published
Seattle : University of Washington Press, 2020.
Edition
First edition.
ISBN
9780295746937, 0295746939
Physical Desc
239 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (chiefly color), color map ; 24 cm
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LocationCall NumberStatusDue Date
EPHRATA PUBLIC LIBRARY - WPL NW Collection577.097 WAGNEROn Hold Shelf
MAILORDER LIBRARY577.097 WAGNERChecked OutFebruary 7, 2023

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Format
Book
Language
English
ISBN
9780295746937, 0295746939

Notes

General Note
"A Ruth Kirk book"
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 227-231) and index.
Description
"How life bounces back from epic destruction On May 18, 1980, people all over the world watched with awe and horror as Mount St. Helens erupted in southwestern Washington. Fifty-seven people were killed, and hundreds of square miles of what had been lush forests and wild rivers were to all appearances destroyed. While most people thought of the eruption as a catastrophe, a small, ragtag team of ecologists did not. For them, the eruption of Mount St. Helens was the opportunity of a lifetime. Here was an unprecedented chance to test some of ecology's oldest and most august theories about how plants and animals recover from a massive disturbance. Ecologists thought they would have to wait years, or even decades, for life to return to the mountain. But when a forest scientist named Jerry Franklin helicoptered into the blast area a couple of weeks after the eruption, he found small plants bursting through the ash and animals skittering over the ground. Stunned, he realized he and his colleagues had been thinking of the volcano in completely the wrong way. Rather than being a dead zone, the mountain was very much alive. Mount St. Helens has been surprising ecologists ever since, and in After the Blast, Eric Wagner takes readers on a fascinating journey through the blast area and beyond. From fireweed to elk, the plants and animals Franklin saw would not just change how ecologists approached the eruption and its landscape, but also prompt them to think in new ways about how life responds in the face of seeming total devastation"--
Description
May 18, 1980. People all over the world watched with awe and horror as Mount St. Helens erupted in southwestern Washington. Fifty-seven people were killed, and hundreds of square miles of what had been lush forests and wild rivers were to all appearances destroyed. For ecologists, this was an unprecedented chance to test some of ecology's oldest and most august theories about how plants and animals recover from a massive disturbance. When forest scientist Jerry Franklin helicoptered into the blast area a couple of weeks after the eruption, he found small plants bursting through the ash and animals skittering over the ground. Rather than being a dead zone, the mountain was very much alive. Wagner takes readers on a fascinating journey through the blast area and beyond.

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Citations

APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

Wagner, E. L. (2020). After the blast: the ecological recovery of Mount St. Helens (First edition.). University of Washington Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Wagner, Eric Loudon. 2020. After the Blast: The Ecological Recovery of Mount St. Helens. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Wagner, Eric Loudon. After the Blast: The Ecological Recovery of Mount St. Helens Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2020.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

Wagner, Eric Loudon. After the Blast: The Ecological Recovery of Mount St. Helens First edition., University of Washington Press, 2020.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

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